From Goat To Goat Milk Soap

BY GOAT MILK STUFF

Take the journey with us while we follow the steps of making goat milk soap, beginning on the farm and ending with a nice new bar of soap.

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MILK GOITER IN GOAT KIDS

BY KARIN CHRISTENSEN
Owners of Nubians, Boers and a few other breeds of goats are familiar with the large throat swellings that occur on the sides of the neck just under jaw line and sometimes including the area under the jaw in young kids. These soft swellings, called “milk goiter”, will begin to appear at about a week of age, increasing in size to about 4 months of age, then will regress by the time the kid is 6 to 9 months old.
FULL STORY

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CONTROLLING GRASS TETANY IN LIVESTOCK

REVISED BY CHRIS ALLISON
Grass Tetany, sometimes called grass staggers, wheat-pasture poisoning, lactation tetany and hypomagnesaemia, is a metabolic disorder of livestock. It occurs primarily in ruminant animals; lactating cows are the most susceptible. Older cows are more susceptible than those with their first or second calves. Also, cows that are herded or worked may be more susceptible to tetany.
FULL STORY

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THIS TEXAS SOLAR FARM RELIES ON A FLOCK OF SHEEP TO PERFORM MAINTENANCE

BY COURTNEY SUBRAMANIAN
The herd keeps the landscape a cut above the rest.
FULL STORY

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THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS HUMANE WOOL WHEN IT IS LEFT ON THE SHEEP: WHY SHEEP SHEARING IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY FOR SHEEP WELFARE

BY SAMANTHA WALKER AND WRITTEN BY ASAS BOARD
As long as there are sheep, shearing must be practiced for the health and hygiene of each individual animal. Unlike other animals, most sheep are unable to shed. If a sheep goes too long without being shorn, a number of problems occur.
FULL STORY

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STUDY GUIDE FOR JUDGING MEAT GOATS

BY THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Step 1: Evaluate meat goats first from the ground up and then from the rump (rear) forward. 2. Rank the traits for their importance. 3. Evaluate the most important traits first. 4. Eliminate any easy placings. 5. Place the class based on the volume of the important traits.
FULL STORY

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PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF ANIMAL DISEASES — APPLICATIONS FOR YOUTH LIVESTOCK SHOWS

BY ROSIE NOLD, DAVID R. SMITH, AND MICHAEL C. BRUMM
Biosecurity at youth livestock shows is key to helping prevent spread of disease.
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