THINKING VISUALLY WITH TEMPLE GRANDIN

LAURA MUSHRUSH

“The animal world is a sensory based world,” said Dr. Temple Grandin of Colorado State University. “What are they seeing? What are they hearing?”

On Wed., August 14, livestock producers filled McCray Hall-Sharon K. Dean Recital Hall at Pittsburg State University, to hear Grandin speak on animal welfare. Grandin, an accomplished author and researcher, has worked with several packing plants to design humane slaughter methods. The well respected livestock handling consultant, also designs working facilities for livestock owners.

FULL STORY

Advertisements

SLOWING DEWORMER RESISTANCE

SUSAN SCHOENIAN

It is a well-known fact that gastro-intestinal parasites (worms) have developed resistance to all of the currently available dewormers (anthelmintics). Resistance means that an anthelmintic treatment is not effective (or only marginally effective) at killing worms and alleviating clinical symptoms. Worm resistance is heritable; the worm’s ability to survive is passed onto its offspring.

FULL STORY

DOGS, THE PERFECT HERDER

COLLEEN BRUNNER

Jeff and DeeLynn Garman of Sundance, Wyo., hosted the annual Sheep Dog Trails at the Butte/Lawrence county fair this year and also showed several of their own animals. Watching the trials is fascinating. Layouts of the sheep dog trial fields may be a little different but the basic format is for the dog and trainer to overcome three different obstacles with three head of sheep in a time frame of five minutes.

FULL STORY

WILL A SHEEP’S WOOL GROW FOREVER?

JESSE HIRSCH

Take a moment to drink in the glory of Shrek the Sheep. Shrek really, really, really did not like getting his hair cut. So for six years, this New Zealand libertarian managed to avoid spring shearings by hiding in a cave. I recently posted this story from another source, but am re-posting it so that you can see Shrek post-shearing and read about wool growth in sheep.

FULL STORY

SHEEP GRAZING

LORETTA SORENSON 

Livestock producers can increase carbon sequestration and speed up soil-quality improvement in grazing areas by partially grazing cool-season forage during the growing season. That’s one of the documented findings of a North Dakota Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) grazing project designed to investigate how mid-season grazing of cover crops affects soil quality.

FULL STORY