Feeding the Lamb Crop

Mike Neary

 Feeding and management of the lamb crop is an important phase of the sheep production cycle. This is not an easy topic to discuss primarily, because there are a number of ways to grow and finish lambs. The type of feeding program will depend in large part on what area of the country one is located, what type of production system is utilized, what the marketing options are and, of course, what feed resources are available.

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MEAT GOAT SELECTION AND CARE

The lack of a well-defined, distinct, and perhaps superior meat goat breed in the United States has adversely affected meat goat production. However, genetic improvement through selection and breeding programs can produce a more desirable animal with a quality carcass that would improve the demand for the product. This publication discusses several points for the selection and care of meat goats. A sample production budget that can be adapted to a particular operation is included and is designed for producers interested in raising meat-type goats.

 

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SELENIUM: ESSENTIAL FOR LIVESTOCK HEALTH

SUSAN R. KERR

 White Muscle Disease is a common, serious but preventable disease of young livestock, causing poor performance and death. The adult form of this deficiency also affects animal health and performance in less dramatic but chronic ways. Responsible livestock producers will learn about WMD and other Selenium-responsive diseases and develop a prevention program for their animals. Don’t learn about WMD the hard way!

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THE VALUE OF DISTILLERS’ GRAINS AS LIVESTOCK FEED

R. LEMENAGER, T. APPLEGATE, M. CLAEYS, S. DONKIN, T. JOHNSON, S. LAKE, M. NEARY, S. RADCLIFFE, B. RICHERT, A. SCHINCKEL, M. SCHUTZ, and A. SUTTON

 Proper production and use of distillers’ co-products as a feed ingredient have the potential to significantly increase their value and reduce any negative impact on the envi-ronment. (The terms “co-products” and “by-products” are often used interchangeably, but “co-product” is the preferred terminol-ogy.) Such a development could also make Indiana’s livestock industry more attractive and competitive in both the domestic and global marketplaces as the price of corn increases to meet the ethanol demand.

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