RAISING THE BEST BUCKS AT PETERSON RANCH

“My granddad on my mother’s side came to the area as a sheep herder for the big John Wilkinson sheep outfit north of Cheyenne, and homesteaded at Mule Creek in 1908. My granddad Peterson moved from Denmark to Iowa, then came to Wyoming and also homesteaded at Mule Creek, in 1916, and went to work for the railroad,” began Clyde Peterson of how his family originally arrived in eastern Wyoming.

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GRAZING MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES

L. E. SOLLENBERGER, J.M.B. VENDRAMINI, AND Y. C. NEWMAN

Grazing management can be defined as the manipulation of livestock grazing to accomplish a desired result. The desired result depends upon the enterprise, but for most producers economic goals are of primary importance. Decisions regarding what grazing management to use are based on the characteristics of the forage being grazed, animal requirements, input costs associated with adopting a particular system, and the probability of return on investment.

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REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT OF SHEEP AND GOATS

DIEGO GIMENEZ, SOREN RODNING

The success of a sheep and goat operation depends on the number of lambs and kids raised, weaned, and marketed each year. The percentage of ewes, does, ewe lambs, and doelings conceived early in the breeding season; the lambing, kidding, and weaning percentages; and the percentage of ewes, does, ewe lambs, and doelings lambing and kidding unassisted are some of the most important factors influencing profits in the sheep and goat business.

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ENTEROTOXEMIA IN LAMBS

DALE M. GROTELUESCHEN, DUANE N. RICE
Enterotoxemia, which is also known as “overeating” or “pulpy kidney” disease, is a highly significant and costly disease problem for the sheep industry. Proper preventive practices are strongly recommended to sheep producers in order to avoid death loss from this disease.
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MASTITIS IN EWES

PHIL SCOTT
The mammary system has two distinct glands, supported largely by the median suspensory ligament, each with its own teat, nerve and blood supplies. The normal gland is firm, without obvious swellings and pain although the ewe may fidget during gland palpation. Examination involves palpation of the gland for the presence of heat, pain and swelling, and examination of any secretions.

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AVOID FOOTROT LIKE THE PLAGUE

MICHAEL NEARY

  Footrot in the ewe flock is a frustrating situation. anyone who has fought footrot can attest to this. Seldom is the battle completely won. Footrot always seems to win a partial victory. Whether through decreased production, increased labor and medication costs, decreased ewe longevity and higher culling rates. Footrot can be a wicked health problem in sheep or can be a mild annoyance.

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GUIDELINES FOR PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

ROCKY LEMUS

 Pasture establishment is vital to ensure high levels of production pastures. Before establishing new pastures or renovating existing pastures, producers must evaluate the farm’s forage needs. It is important to consider how the forage will be used (grazing vs. hay), what species might be more adapted to the area, and what resources (equipment, money, and time) are available. Renovating a pasture should be based on existing percentages of the desirable species present in the pasture.

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