CACHE VALLEY VIRUS, NEXT LAMBING-TIME’S LOSSES CAUSED IN AUTUMN

LAURIE BALL-GISCH

Spring 2012 would see our 551st lamb born at The Lavender Fleece and it would be our 13th lambing season. It was also our first season of lambing the newest additions to our farm—our Leicester Longwools. We always eagerly await the year’s first lambs. Still, each lambing season always teaches me something new. In other words: “It’s always something….”

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TIME OF FEEDING CAN AFFECT YOUR BOTTOM LINE

T. E. MARSHALL, BRUCE LANE, AND GRANT PHILLIPS

University of Missouri Extension and Truman State University recently collaborated on a lamb demonstration project to determine the effects of double-shearing and time of feeding on growth of lambs. Nighttime-fed lambs show significant gains over daytime-fed.

In this study 32 feeder lambs were assigned by sex and weight to either daytime (A.M.) or nighttime (P.M.) feeding groups.

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WINTER FEEDING STRATEGIES AFTER A DROUGHT

JOHN KIRCHHOFF

Nearly every livestock producer at one time or another has experienced drought. When it comes to natural calamities, a drought is more forgiving since it doesn’t happen overnight like a flood or tornado. This gives you the ability to plan ahead and hopefully head off problems before they happen. Fall rains may break a drought in the weatherman’s eyes, but those rains won’t put hay in your barn for winter feeding.

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INDUSTRY-WIDE LAMB COMMITTEE MEETS IN DENVER TO ADDRESS MARKET CHALLENGES

The American Lamb Board coordinated a meeting on Sept. 6 in Denver with a committee representing lamb packers, processors, feeders, producers and affiliated industry organizations including the American Sheep Industry Association and the National Lamb Feeders Association to discuss the current market challenges in the lamb industry. The committee was formed as a result of a request from the California Wool Growers Association to facilitate an open, solutions-based discussion about the issues throughout the entire chain of production that must be addressed to prevent them from occurring again.

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SELECTIVE GRAZING AND AVERSION TO OLIVE AND GRAPE LEAVES ACHIEVED IN GOATS AND SHEEP

Researchers from the Research Group on Ruminants led by Elena Albanell, lecturer in Animal and Food Science at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, have successfully achieved to prevent sheep and goats from chewing on the young leaves of olive trees and grapevines when grazing. By using the natural mechanism of conditioned taste aversion, researchers redirected the food preferences of ruminants, making them more willing to eliminate undesirable plants from these types of pastures, and thereby reducing the use of pesticides and farming equipment.

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